Don’t sink to their level


raise the bar

Today in this blog I want to do two things focused on helping you achieve the success you want — on YOUR terms.

1. Offer you the download of my Strategic Career Thinking webinar for free
2. Encourage you to remain true to yourself at work

So… in reverse order… (Webinar download below)

How to remain true to yourself at work

Every day, out in the world, we all face a broad range of challenges to our personal values that go from minor annoyances to major morale dilemmas and everything in between.

While work can be very uncomfortable at times (that is part of what they pay you for), it’s important to understand your values, and when something does not feel true for you, take a moment to reflect and decide how you want to respond.

Let me start with a small example:

Late for meetings

Late meetings cost the business world at large countless millions of dollars of lost productivity. It’s simply bad business. I know many people who don’t believe in being late to meetings, and they ask me, “If I go on time, I’m the only the only one there. What should I do?”

Don’t sink to their level. Go on time. Always. Set the positive example.

DO the right thing. Do the thing that is true for you. I have spent a lot of time sitting alone in meeting rooms. But in doing this I was accomplishing two things. 1. I was not degrading my self respect by falling in line with the bad behaviors of others. 2. I was sometimes able to influence others by positive example.

By the way, if you don’t expect people to be on time for meetings, don’t expect them to be on time for product launches either. Small habits reinforce or degrade your organization’s ability to execute. Be one of the people who is not contributing to the decline. More on the importance of small habits for successful execution here

Ugly, back-stabbing politics

Now a bigger, uglier example:

It always amazes me how many truly dreadful managers there are out there. On the Coaching Hour calls in my membership program, there are regularly leaders seeking advice for how to deal with an abusive or clueless or uncommunicative or solely politically driven boss. (To name but a few.)

In advance of my next webinar on Building Trust and Motivation, I’ve been getting messages from members asking, “But what can I do to build trust when my boss is working so fast to destroy it?”

…Bosses doing things like changing the game constantly, lying, bullying, not following through on commitments, demanding results with no support or resources, stealing credit, preventing employees from communicating with anyone outside the organization. (To name but a few.)

My advice — Again. don’t sink to their level.

Sadly part of your job as a leader if you are in this situation is to catch and hide the crap from your team.

You need to decide what is true for you. What is the kind of manager you want to be? Do your best to be that manager with your team, despite bad behaviors above and around you.

Insulate your team as much as possible from the bad behaviors of others. Don’t be tempted to act the same way because it seems like it’s expected in your environment.

Pressure to sink…

I actually got performance feedback as an executive once that “Patty doesn’t fight enough”. In this environment, the executive staff meetings were very nasty. The CEO liked it when his team fought. I refused to participate. For months I was losing points with the CEO.

But then something interesting happened…

After listening to the fights calmly, I was able to see a path forward. After about 45 minutes of fighting I would say something like:

“In listening to all of you, it seems while we disagree on X, what do agree on is that this outcome Y is the most important thing. Why don’t we start with Y and work backwards. For example, I think we can all agree that to enable Y, we must do Z”.

The funny thing that happened was that after about 6 months, the team would fight, I’d sit there not fighting, and then one of them would say:

“OK, Patty, I think we have fought enough now, we need you do that thing that you do, where you get us to start working on the part that we can agree on”.

But I can tell you that if I would have taken the feedback and started fighting, I would have been absolutely miserable, because that was not a way of working that was true to my own values.

When everybody else is being nasty or political, it’s easy to think that the only way to show strength and be credible is to also be nasty and political.

But being authentic will always be your strongest and most credible position.

You need to stay aware and in the game so people don’t take you down while you are not looking, but you don’t need to sink to their level and play on their negative terms. Don’t sink to their level.

Trust and Acknowledgement, often lacking…

When I was an executive or CEO, although some of my managers and board members treated me with support and were not un-kind, none of them ever went out of their way to make sure I was OK, or to proactively acknowledge my extra hard work and efforts.

But I always tried to do this for my team. I’m sure I did not have a perfect record at doing this, but I’m equally sure that I did not have a zero-record.

I would regularly say things like “This is a really hard job, how are you holding up?”, or “I’m sorry that assignment took you away from your family so much. I want you to know that I recognize that and really appreciate it. We’ll do something for you and them when it’s done”. Or “Wow, you did that much better than I ever imagined it could be done, I’m very impressed”.

After I certain point in advancing my career, no one ever said those things to me ever again.

While I accepted that that was part of the basic environment of what I signed up for to work at that level, it was never true for me to treat others that way. So I didn’t sink to the level of “expected/encouraged/tolerated executive detachment”.

I’m not sure why most big executives find acknowledgment uncomfortable or even the outright, wrong thing to do. In some ways I think it’s kind of a macho thing – I have more control over you if I don’t let you know how much I appreciate you. (heavy sigh)

In my experience it only makes you stronger as a leader to give acknowledgment and credit where it is due. For two reasons:

1. If you acknowledge people, they trust you more — which automatically gives you leadership points, not less.
2. When people feel acknowledged, they work harder and give more energy, creativity and time to the task at hand so your organization performs better.

FREE WEBINAR DOWNLOAD

A big part of being successful and feeling satisfied with your work is that you find a way of working that maximizes your strengths and energy, and your ability to be you truly are.

Last month I did a webinar focused on helping you think about what you really want in your life, and how you can get your career on a path to give you more of that.

I wanted to share these ideas with everyone who wants to make a positive change in their life this year, so I’m offering the important webinar at no cost in January.

Download my last webinar, “Thinking Strategically About Your Career“, free for the month of January.

This webinar is part of my Professional Development Membership program. Members get lots of wonderful career and leadership resources — and personal coaching from me.

Webinar download here.

What do you think?

Join the conversation about this on my facebook page.

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About Patty
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Patty Azzarello is an executive, best-selling author, speaker and CEO/Business Advisor. She became the youngest general manager at HP at the age of 33, ran a billion dollar software business at 35 and became a CEO for the first time at 38 (all without turning into a self-centered, miserable jerk)

You can find Patty at www.AzzarelloGroup.com, follow her on twitter or facebook, or read her book RISE…3 Practical Steps for Advancing Your Career, Standing Out as a Leader, AND Liking Your Life.

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6 key choices for success and happiness


choices

Our choices

As we start the new year I’ve been thinking about choices.

I realized that there are some simple, key choices that we all have immediately available to us that can help us be more true to ourselves, and become happier and more successful at work and life — no matter where we are starting from.

These is certainly not an exhaustive list, but I have found that focusing on each of these practical choices always brings about a bigger positive change in my life and work than I expect.

Choice #1. The right people

Who you choose to spend time with has an enormous impact on your life. It strongly defines your level self-confidence (positive or negative), and your energy to move your life forward in ways that are important to you. And sadly, the reality is that the negative people have a bigger impact than the positive. So choose very carefully.

Spend time with people who make you better.

Spend time with people who encourage you to grow — people who challenge you in fun and inspiring ways to be the best version of you. Choose people who become happy when they see you grow.

Prioritize spending time with these people.

The world (or even perhaps some people in your group of friends or family) is full of people who will try to make you feel like you are doing something wrong by reaching further and wanting to improve yourself.

If you have these people in your life who don’t want you to grow, who hold you back, sabotage you, or try make you feel bad about your efforts to improve – these people are not your friends. Walk away.

If you are forced to work with bosses or peers who are holding you back, change something. — Either change your job — or (if you don’t want to change your job because it has other positives) add a new inspiring person to your mix whose energy will counteract the force of the toxic ones. Purposefully limit your time with these negative people.

Choice #2. Don’t give away your power

As a follow on to the first point when people try to drag you down or hold you back, remember, it is always about them. It is never about you. Expect it and guard against it. Keep pushing forward.

Don’t give away your power to make others feel more comfortable.

Don’t be afraid to be best yourself at full strength. It is good for you, and everyone that matters. Let the people who don’t honor the real you go away.

For example, one thing I see as people advance in their careers is that someone will get a promotion, and then become uncomfortable leading former peers.

If you get a promotion, step up. Don’t feel like you have to shrink away from the power of your bigger role to get former peers to like you. They need you to lead. Very often I have to advise new executives “it’s time to give yourself a promotion”!

You are allowed to be the best, most powerful version of you.

Sacrificing your power and becoming a smaller version of yourself to make someone else feel better about themselves does not work. It doesn’t actually make them feel better, and you suffer the loss of your true and best self.

Remember, not all people have the energy and ambition to invest in success the way that you do. That’s OK. Because that is only about them. It has nothing to do with you. Don’t let their smaller view make you feel bad about your bigger goals.

By the way, you have a boss who insists that you do this — that you stay small to make him or her look better, 1. You have a bad boss. 2. It’s not about you. 3. You really need to get a new boss!

If you haven’t read my book RISE, now is the time.

Choice #3. Be Creative

All people are creative. All people have a need to be creative. When we are little kids, we all sing, dance, draw, and paint. ALL of us. Then many of us stop because we are told by someone in the world that we don’t have enough talent — as though we don’t have a right to continue to do those things.

If you are feeling stressed, overwhelmed, or out of control, you will feel a lot better if you create something. Invent something that was not there before you made it. Sing, dance, draw, write, build. The outcome is actually not important at all. The process is.

Turn off all the distractions from the various glowing screens in your life for 30 minutes, and create something entirely from your own brain and efforts. It will make you feel better. And it gives your brain a real rest from the usual stresses, because you are actively engaging it in something else that you are in total control of.

Choice #4. Exercise

Awhile back I wrote a blog about What I learned from exercising 100 days in a row. I’m still at it. I’m well past the 6 month mark now.

Do something physical every day.

Exercise also makes your brain feel better and gives you more positive energy for your work and life. The biggest lesson I learned from exercising every day is that is it far easier to do something “not optional” than it is to do something that I think I “should do”. And I definitely feel better. (I can eat and drink more too!)

Choice #5. Remove Clutter

Most professional people I talk to are very busy and feel overwhelmed in some way. They have too much work and not enough time. I’ve written and spoken about Ruthless Priorities, and Strategic Time Management. But one of the most straightforward things you can do to save time and reduce the feeling of being overwhelmed is to simply eliminate clutter.

Eliminate clutter in your email inbox, in your office and your sock drawer. When you eliminate clutter, you don’t have to spend time looking for things. The important things show themselves.

When you eliminate clutter in your physical space, it eliminates clutter in your mental state. It helps you think more clearly about what is important to you, it makes you feel more in control, and it reduces the feeling of being overwhelmed.

Choice #6. Don’t stay angry

There will always be things in the world that make us angry. Science says that the physical/chemical anger reaction is a real thing in our bodies. But it’s important to note that that physical reaction runs its course in 90 seconds.

So getting angry is not a choice. But staying angry is a choice.

Whenever I pass the 5 minute mark on being angry I remind myself that this is now my choice. Staying angry makes you really tired. Nothing in life is better when you stay angry.

Defending your right to be angry over and over again doesn’t make you feel better, it keeps you stuck and exhausts you. I love the expression:

Staying angry is like you drinking poison and waiting for the other person to die

I also love something the Dali Lama said when someone questioned him about his pursuit of happiness in the face of so much suffering in the world. He explained that he spends 1 hour per day to thoroughly mourn for all the people and animals suffering in the world. But only 1 hour. Then he moves his focus to gratefulness and kindness for the rest of each day. I might not have that exactly right, but it’s hard to imagine that that is a bad idea!

What do you think?

What choices do you make that make you happier and more successful?
Join the conversation about this on my facebook page.

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About Patty
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Patty Azzarello is an executive, best-selling author, speaker and CEO/Business Advisor. She became the youngest general manager at HP at the age of 33, ran a billion dollar software business at 35 and became a CEO for the first time at 38 (all without turning into a self-centered, miserable jerk)

You can find Patty at www.AzzarelloGroup.com, follow her on twitter or facebook, or read her book RISE…3 Practical Steps for Advancing Your Career, Standing Out as a Leader, AND Liking Your Life.

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Good things to learn from bad people


good things to learn

Sometimes the bad guy wins…

Clients often ask me for advice on how to deal with highly political people who are not very good at anything other than managing up. And it’s especially frustrating because it seems to be working really well for them.

We’ve all seen these people — We all dislike these people.

What do you do? How do you defend? compete?

I have always had a very simple approach here:

Don’t waste time resenting the success of those who don’t deserve success. See what you can learn instead.

Learn Something

I have worked in the presence of many people who were super successful, while seeming entirely undeserving of that success — and all of the rest of us were left wondering, “How could that possible be working for them?”

It seems very unfair when people without big talent but who are very politically agile succeed. Or when people are quite talented, but are horrible people, dishonest, or vain and abusive to others, but seem to get ahead anyway.

It’s interesting to me that on my member Coaching Hour Calls, so many of the issues members bring up are about how to deal with truly horrible bosses or peers. Sadly there are a lot of them out there…

Throughout my career when I would see someone who was more successful than me, but I couldn’t stand them, this was my strategy:

Never begrudge anyone their success. Learn something instead.
I have learned a lot from people that I would never dream of modeling my behavior after — I realized that I could separate the learning opportunity from the personality.

You don’t have to copy the style to use the learning.

When you see someone who is really good at managing up, or really good at winning over a crowd but who in reality is an awful person, or who has no real content to back up what they are saying, put your distaste aside, and focus finding something you can learn. They are doing something that you can learn something from.

It might be the way they are talking. It might be the type of people they are engaging. It might be the style of words they are using. It might be the relationships they have built in the background that have nothing to do with what they are talking about in the moment.

Once you stop focusing on everything that is wrong with this person, and focus on discerning something specific they are doing effectively, you can start to learn things.

Then you can ask yourself:

“Is there any part of what I have learned that I can use in a way that has integrity for me?”

I would find that at this point, one of two things would happen.

1. I would learn something interesting about how to address or motivate a particular audience — AND I could conceive of a way to apply that learning with my own style and values — a vastly different style that would be authentic to my brand and have integrity for me.

or…

2. I would learn that whatever they were doing to get their success was something I would never do, such as being purely self-serving, hurting others, or outright lying.

But I still learned something. I learned that because of my values I might be blocked from that particular type of success, and that was OK.

But it would challenge me to go back and think about if there might be another way entirely to get a similar outcome with integrity.

In any case, when I focused my energy on learning, instead being angry or resentful, I found that to be a much better use of energy. Simply begrudging someone of their success, even if they don’t deserve it, does nothing to move your own career forward.

What do you think?

Join the conversation about this on my Facebook page.

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ABOUT PATTY:

patty blog image
Patty Azzarello is an executive, best-selling author, speaker and CEO/Business Advisor.
She became the youngest general manager at HP at the age of 33, ran a billion dollar software business at 35 and became a CEO for the first time at 38 (all without turning into a self-centered, miserable jerk)

You can find Patty at www.AzzarelloGroup.com, follow her on twitter or Facebook, or read her book RISE…3 Practical Steps for Advancing Your Career, Standing Out as a Leader, AND Liking Your Life.

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The business-enabling conversation many executives avoid


conversatons

Missing the clues

I work as a business advisor to executives, and in doing so also I often also have 1-1 conversations with their direct reports.

I can’t count how many times, though I am having confidential conversations with each of them, I am left thinking, “Do you two ever talk to each other?”

They are often in violent agreement about how they feel, about what needs to be done, and about what role each of them should play in doing it. But to talk to either of them you’d think that they lived on different planets.

The executive will say, “This leader just isn’t getting it, I need him to show that he is more…[fill in the blank]“, and the leader will say, “I’m so frustrated because I want to be more… [fill in the same blank], but the executive [doesn't do or understand something].

Please just talk to each other.

“Make it so”

Executives seem to want to say, “Here’s the situation, I need you to do this.”

Their expectation is that the manger will say, “OK, will do”. And come back with a programmatic response about getting it done.

While that sounds kind of OK, it avoids any real conversation about it. And many executives seem to prefer it that way. But this lack of real conversation leaves a big gap in the organizations’s ability to perform.

I have tried to understand why so many executives seem to avoid unstructured conversations with the people on their teams.

They often dismiss it as a waste of time. Or some executives think that they are above this type of communication.

But what I believe is really going on is that they feel like unstructured conversation will be uncomfortable.

I haven’t really figured out all the reasons for the avoidance, but I can tell you for sure, that it’s the avoiding of real conversations that invites risk in the business.

Yes, it can become uncomfortable

The reason it is uncomfortable is because instead of the sterile, “I want a plan”, “Here is a my plan” type of communication, you open yourself to a conversation that can be messy: It’s personal, creative, and maybe emotional.

But don’t you want to engage your leaders on a creative, personal, and emotional level? Won’t they be more effective?

When these conversations are not happening, performance suffers.

Motivation also suffers — but performance actually suffers. Teams get stuck because the underlying belief system which needs to support whatever the organization is trying to do is not in alignment — because you haven’t actually talked about it!

“What do you really think?”

When I had my first major executive role, with people very much my senior reporting to me, I was always concerned that they would not feel OK about reporting to me.

After a short time, I realized that not only were they comfortable reporting to me, they were quite happy about it. I kept doubting and second guessing myself thinking, “how can it be that these very experienced people enjoy reporting to ME?”

What I now realize is that a huge part of the answer is that I would regularly ask them in an unstructured way, “What do you think?”

Know for sure

As an executive, you really need to have a high level of confidence that you and your team have aligned your belief systems about what you need to do.

As an executive depending on a team to execute, how could you not want to know what people really think?

You need to make sure you align on:

1. Why are we doing this?
2. Do we really agree about what is important?
3. Do we share a belief system that supports the success of this mission? (for example: a growing market exists, a competitor will stumble, a supplier will remain available)

If you as the executive are only broadcasting what needs to be done, and your team is saying “OK”, you are assuming that you agree on the answers to these three questions, but you will never know for sure.

Start the conversation

It can be as simple as, this question: “Here’s what I’m thinking and why? What do you really think?”

Once you have rolled out your new strategy or intentions, before you ask your team to create plans and budgets, it’s a really good idea to have a conversation with each person and ask, “what do you think?”.

It’s also really important to have the same unstructured discussion with your team. “Let’s talk about what we all think about this.”

Sure it might get messy. But you need to allow that and work through it. Your only other choice is people starting down the course of implementing the strategy with a lot of personal doubts, low motivation, or actual disagreements.

By avoiding messy conversation what you have actually done is traded a false sense of order and harmony in the short term, for a slow moving catastrophe where people are not effectively set up to succeed at the new thing in the long term.

I can tell you from the many executives and teams that I work with, when we allow these types of conversations to happen and THEN build a specific plan to put the new strategy into action, it has a much higher success rate.

Because people only become personally bought in and engaged, when you give them the opportunity to engage on a personal level — through real conversation.

What do you think?

Join the conversation about this on my facebook page.

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About Patty
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Patty Azzarello is an executive, best-selling author, speaker and CEO/Business Advisor. She became the youngest general manager at HP at the age of 33, ran a billion dollar software business at 35 and became a CEO for the first time at 38 (all without turning into a self-centered, miserable jerk)

You can find Patty at www.AzzarelloGroup.com, follow her on twitter or facebook.

And make sure to read her book
RISE…
3 Practical Steps for Advancing Your Career, Standing Out as a Leader, AND Liking Your Life.

The answers to your career struggles and your next promotion are in it!

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Imagined power vs. Real power and respect


real or imagined power

People often ask me if it was hard for me to go from running really large organizations to having my own (implied — “much smaller”) company.

This was never an issue for me because I always maintained a psychological distance between the power of my role, (managing a $1B+ global business, multi-hundred-milion dollar budget, and thousands of people) and my own personal power.

I took responsibility for the power of the large role very seriously, but I never pretended that I personally owned that power.
So when I stepped out of a huge business into a small business, it was not difficult for me, because I was still the same me.

But I often see executives who claim this big role power for their own — I refer to this as Imagined Power.

Imagined-Power People

I am thinking of one woman in particular who exemplified this behavior. She was a C-Level direct report to the CEO a fortune 50 company.

She was meeting me and my peers who were at the time C-Level direct reports to the CEO of a fortune 5000 company. Her dismissive demeanor made it immediately clear that she saw us as way below her on the food chain.

I remember thinking when I met her: Wow you are trying so very hard to make sure you come across as a big, scary executive. That must be exhausting!

I wondered…Is this because:

1. You are insecure and have a need to make people feel like you are more powerful than they are?
2. You were taught, or simply believe, that this is the way a big executive is supposed to treat others?
3. You are so self-involved that you don’t even realize that you are so thoroughly dismissing people?
4. You actually believe that you are a superior life form?

I never know which of these is at play when I meet one of these executives. But I always feel that they are confusing the power of their role, with their own power.

Real-power people and respect

The leaders that most inspired me the most were the ones that did not get caught up in personal power. They were the ones who built true business power by engaging and respecting employees at all levels.

They were the ones who even though they far above me organizationally, would sit across the table and talk to me as an equal. They’d say things like, “This is a tough business we are in! What are you seeing out there? What do you think I should do?” They were interested. They were open. They were always learning.

Wasted energy

The problem with treating role power as personal power, is that since that grand-scale personal power is not actually real, you need to spend an awful lot of time and energy manufacturing the facade, and then protecting it.

That is time taken away from effectively leading and doing stuff. Not to mention it does nothing to build any trust and loyalty — Quite the contrary it builds fear and resentment.

Real Business Power

If you take the other road of acknowledging you have a big responsibility — because you are in a powerful role — but you share power and respect with others, you will build a loyal and powerful team to support you. So you actually gain real power in your business. Much bigger power than you can create if you try to own the power yourself.

You end up with an army of people who will do great things to make the business succeed. They have your back because you are sharing the power. People like that.

I’d rather have 1000 peoples’ worth of positive power, genuine support, and forward momentum in my business, than to try to build my own power by keeping 1000 people down. It is exhausting to even think about! I choose the road of helping people thrive.

Here are some practical ways that I have seen the difference play out.

1. Human vs. Boss

If the thinking starts with we are both humans vs. I am the boss and you are the worker, you create an environment where everyone feels acknowledged.

If you flaunt special privileges that only the boss gets, everyone else feels resentful and will not bring their best to the business.

If you bother to spend personal time with people in the trenches, on the assembly line, on the help desk, or literally in the trenches (if your business digs trenches), you show that you understand and value all the jobs in your organization and you are not “above it all”.

It builds tremendous loyalty because when you ask someone to do work for you, they know you appreciate what you are asking them to do. It is hard to over-estimate the value of this as a leader.

2. Curious vs. Right

People protecting their power need to be right and to stay right. So it’s not just that they are not good listeners, they actually need to not listen — because what they hear might threaten their power facade.

Leaders who are genuinely curious invite new ideas and are always learning. They learn what is really going on in their organization and therefore know what is causing inefficiency, frustration and suffering — so they can fix it.

The Always-Right executive doesn’t want to hear it. They are right often enough that they can succeed to a certain extent, but they miss the opportunity to recognize breakthroughs that others might contribute. And they never have a truly loyal team to help them when things get tough.

3. Promote others vs. Inflate yourself

Leaders who take personal credit for their organizations’ work are again, trying to hold on to false personal power. Leaders who promote and elevate their stars build a much higher value organization.

This is well said in the book Five Frogs on a Log by Mark Feldman and Michael Spratt: “A players hire A+ players, B players hire C players, and C players hire idiots.” Insecure leaders who hire weak players so no one threatens them, make the whole organization weaker.

A players (leaders who share power) hire people better than themselves and give them support to excel. Then they give them recognition and help them move up. The whole organization gets stronger.

4. Open vs. Secret

People protecting false personal power are very secretive. They believe that if they know more than everyone else, they will remain very important.

Real leaders communicate a lot. They make it a point to share as much information as possible with everybody.

They see additional power in having a well-informed team that can contribute more because they know more, a team who is motivated to contribute more because they feel respected.

5. Respect vs. Money

Another trait I have seen with leaders protecting their personal power is that they need buy people off.

They pay people more money than they could make elsewhere, with a key requirement of the job a being:

Don’t question me, stay in your place, and make me look good. Build up my ego by being at my beckon call. I pay you a lot, I deserve your un-wavering and constant adoration.

Effective leaders win people over by building an environment of trust and respect. They create meaning for people so they can feel proud of their work. They offer personal recognition. They go out of their way to make the work matter to people the people doing it.

Your choice…

I was very fortunate early in my career to meet a mentor who showed me that you could be a very successful business leader by respecting people, and sharing power.

There are many examples of executives that go the other way… They hoard power and treat people like crap. I might have believed that was necessary without a good role model.

You can certainly succeed as a power hungry asshole, but it’s not a requirement. I also believe that building a strong team is a much more reliable approach to achieving success, and it gives you more real power in the end.

What do you think?

Please add your comments to the conversation about this on my
Azzarello Group Facebook page.

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About Patty
patty blog image crop

Patty Azzarello is an executive, best-selling author, speaker and CEO/Business Advisor. She became the youngest general manager at HP at the age of 33, ran a billion dollar software business at 35 and became a CEO for the first time at 38 (all without turning into a self-centered, miserable jerk)

You can find Patty at www.AzzarelloGroup.com, follow her on twitter or facebook, or read her book RISE…3 Practical Steps for Advancing Your Career, Standing Out as a Leader, AND Liking Your Life.

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Free eBook Download