Meeting your new boss for the first time? Get it right


Close-up picture of the Brooklyn Bridge cables in Brooklyn, New york, 2009.

You have a new boss…how do you make a good impression?

When you get an opportunity to meet your new boss, what should you do? This question comes up frequently in my member coaching hours, so I thought I would address it in a blog.

Your goals:

First think about what you are trying to accomplish.

Here’s a list to get you started:

  • Stand out
  • Don’t be annoying
  • Be helpful
  • Be welcome for the next meeting

Think about how your new boss feels in this moment.

Start by putting yourself in their position.

How would you feel if you were new in this job, meeting dozens if not hundreds of people, trying to learn what you need to learn as fast as possible, and trying to share your point of view in a credible way?

What would be most useful to you, and What would be most annoying to you?

It’s important to remember that your meeting and conversation is one of a gazillion that he or she will be having while coming up to speed. And it’s also important to remember your boss is a human, who is probably tired, stressed and also trying to make a good impression.

DO’s and DONT’s

First, here are some DONT’s:

Don’t: Provide a long anything. Long meetings, long descriptions, long documents. It’s exhausting and not useful. Your story is only important to you in this moment. Don’t share too much.

Don’t: Make urgent requests or demands. They just walked in the door. It’s not the time to ask for stuff.

Don’t: Insist they explain their thoughts or strategies if they are not ready. Let them share as much as they want, but don’t push them for more information in the first meeting.

(By the way, I’ve had people do all of these things when meeting me as their boss for the first time. It was indeed annoying, and not useful.)

Here are some DO’s:

Here are DO’s to help you stand out in a positive way and add some value in that first meeting.

Be well informed

Don’t go to this first meeting without doing some homework.

Never ask your new boss for information about them that is readily available online. That is just wasting their time.

Do your best to learn what is important to your new boss before the meeting and use that as the context for everything you say.

Ask their assistant, ask others who have talked to them. Look online to learn their key accomplishments, and opinions and see if there are common themes they have written about.

Be curious

Now you’ve already got some information from having done your homework, but it’s also good to ask them about their plans and thoughts.

Ask, “What are you thinking is most important right now for moving the business forward? What are the biggest issues you see? What are the most important things that need your team to understand right now?”

If they are ready to talk about it, ask good questions but resist the urge to voice any disagreements in this first meeting. Resist the urge to tell them everything that you know.

This first meeting is about building rapport.

If you have concerns about what you are hearing, take notes, then go away and think about how you want to react or respond. But don’t do it in this first meeting, just listen.

Share your information efficiently – Translate

Once you know what is important to them, from your homework and your initial conversation, then you can translate how you talk about your work and your role to connect to something that is important to them.

For example, if you learn that they are driving to improve profit margins in the legacy business in parallel with an innovative new investment, tune everything you say to be part of one of those things.

Whether you are in Marketing, R&D, Supply Chain management, Sales, Finance…

Whatever your function, your story about what your team does should have the frame of the business drivers your new boss cares about.

What you share should not be a list of things in your function, full of your project names, jargon and acronyms. In this example what ever you say about your work should have the frame of improving profit margins on legacy or supporting the new investment.

And make sure to be brief!

Whatever you share, put it on one page. The time it takes to thoughtfully turn a huge pile of information into one page will be very worth it.

Don’t add weight

(Don’t give your new boss problems or questions in the first meeting)

If you have been anxiously waiting for your new boss to arrive to make decisions or resource approvals, don’t use this first meeting to ask.

The goal of this first meeting, like any other first networking meeting is to get invited back for another meeting.

If you start asking for things in the first meeting you are adding weight to the load your new boss is already carrying, which is heavy by definition.

You are much better off to share your plans in an inspiring way, translated and connected to the initiatives they already know about and care about. Then ask if you can have another meeting to discuss key elements of your plan later.

A wise mentor of mine taught me, you need to have the first meeting before you have the second meeting.

Unless your new boss asks you in that first meeting, “Is there anything specific that you need from me?”, don’t start asking in the first meeting.

Be helpful

(take weight away)

Offer to help. You can ask, “As you start this new role is there anything I can do to help you? Is there information I can collect for you? Are there any tasks that I can take off your plate?”

If you make your first impression as someone who is well informed, is already investing energy in the initiatives your new boss cares about because you talked about your work with the right frame, and offer to help, instead of giving them extra work, you will be seen as someone who doesn’t add weight. You’ll be seen as someone who takes weight away.

And as someone who doesn’t add weight, you will be invited back. You will stand out. You will be someone your new boss has time for.

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ABOUT PATTY:

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Patty Azzarello is an executive, best-selling author, speaker and CEO/Business Advisor.
She became the youngest general manager at HP at the age of 33, ran a billion dollar software business at 35 and became a CEO for the first time at 38 (all without turning into a self-centered, miserable jerk)

You can find Patty at www.AzzarelloGroup.com, follow her on twitter or Facebook, or read her book RISE…3 Practical Steps for Advancing Your Career, Standing Out as a Leader, AND Liking Your Life.

Don’t volunteer for failure: Always show the cost of success


cost failure

When the expectations are bigger than the resources

Recently, I have been getting the same question over and over again from people in many different companies and industries. It takes many different forms, but the basic idea is this:

“What should I do when I am being asked to deliver something without enough resources to do it?”

This challenge becomes a critical point in your career because you need to find a way to deliver the best possible outcome, without setting yourself up to try and do something totally impossible (which by definition you will fail at).

If you go forth and try to make it happen without clarifying expecations and resources up front, you set yourself up for a big risk.

Conversely, if you say, “I don’t have the resources to do that” in an unstructured way, you might also take a credibility hit.

So what do you do?

The three converations you need to lead:

1. Show the scope of the journey out of the hole you are in
2. Highlight the choices of outcomes and costs
3. Share the problem that WE have

1. Show the size and scope of the hole that you are in

The problem is that the executives do not understand the scope of what they are asking. They are entirely focused on the outcome that they want, and they want you to make it happen.

To them it seems straightforward (cheap) to get the improvement, because they don’t fully understand why, or even that they are in a hole. They know they are not performing, but because they do not have your expertise, they can’t see the 37 reasons why.

If you don’t show them the reality, there is a good chance they will believe that only thing between where they are now and best in class performance is YOU, with no additional staff, budget or time to get there.

Don’t let this happen. Act right away.

Create something that looks kind of like this. The left axis is whatever it takes to be competitive in your space.

Status Reality

2. Highlight the choices of outcomes and costs

You need to show the true cost of the big outcome they want.

Then you need to give the management choices for different levels of outcomes that cost different amounts.

OK, if you only increase my budget 10% we can fix these things, and add one item, but we can’t add most of the competitive features. If that’s the funding choice you make, this is what you will get.

The chart looks something like this:

Budget Options

This way you are still building credibility by showing that you can do the complete job, but you are not shooting yourself in the foot by signing up for the impossible.

3. Share the problem that WE have

The impossible is stressful!

Don’t put all the pressure on yourself to try to do the impossible without the necessary resources, becasue you will feel like you are personally failing when it can’t be done, when in reality this is not your problem alone.

This is a choice that the company needs to make.

Your job is to shine the spotlight on clearly defined choices.

Do yourself a favor and make sure you paint the reality clearly as soon as you can, and only sign up for as much as you can get funded.

1. Share the knowledge of the scope of the journey
2. Share the decision about the level of investment and expected outcomes with the management team
3. Make sure everyone has the same definition of success. It’s not just you who should feel the pressure

What do you think?

Join the conversation about this on my facebook page.

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About Patty
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Patty Azzarello is an executive, best-selling author, speaker and CEO/Business Advisor. She became the youngest general manager at HP at the age of 33, ran a billion dollar software business at 35 and became a CEO for the first time at 38 (all without turning into a self-centered, miserable jerk)

You can find Patty at www.AzzarelloGroup.com, follow her on twitter or facebook, or read her book RISE…3 Practical Steps for Advancing Your Career, Standing Out as a Leader, AND Liking Your Life.

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Don’t try so hard to be impressive


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When you need to Impress…

If you are in a situation where you need to be impressive, a job interview, a sales call, a negotiation, a presentation — one of the worst things you can do is to try, on purpose to be impressive.

When you think about trying to be impressive you immediately put yourself in a defensive mode, and you immediately put yourself in mode that is not-authentic.
Trying to be impressive makes you behave in a way that you are “trying” vs. “being”.

You are always better off starting from an authentic place because you are never actually more impressive when you are trying to be impressive!

Think Useful vs. Impressive

At one point I learned to stop being afraid of not being good enough, and to just give up on ever trying to be impressive on purpose. Instead I focused on trying to be genuinely useful.

The first step in actually impressing someone is to give them something useful or valuable. The value is what creates the impression. So before you walk into the siutation, put some thought into what the person or audience will truly value and prepare to deliver that.

Think “Helping a Friend”

When you prepare for a communication of any kind, if you think about being impressive, it will weigh on your nerves. Your heart rate goes up, your voice gets higher and your whole demeanor betrays, “I’m really not confident but I’m trying to impress you!”

I needed to figure out a way to manage my nerves. The way I ultimately solved this problem was instead of trying to be impressive, I would get myself in the mindset of:

“What would I be saying and doing if I were trying to help my best friend?”

Instead of thinking of positioning and selling and marketing and convincing, I would think, “What would I say if this executive, client, hiring manager or prospect sitting across the table from me was actually my best friend?”

More comfortable, more useful

First and foremost I would be much more comfortable and less nervous. I would be thinking, hello friend…1. How are you? I’m actually interested. What’s important to you? And 2. How can I help?

And if what I have to present is not genuinely interesting or helpful to them, then I wouldn’t drag them through my presentation! I wouldn’t do that to my best friend. I’d talk about whatever would actually help them.

This doesn’t mean you cannot have the intention to persuade or to sell, it just means you’ll actually do a better job persuading and selling because you put yourself in the mode of genuinely trying to be helpful!

I can tell you that I’ve spent 52 minutes of a 1 hour meeting discussing their problems with teen-agers, their boss, a challenging project or colleague…and in that conversation have found an authentic hook to offer something of value to get to the next meeting or the next step in the last 8 minutes. And I can tell you that this was a much more successful outcome than I would have achieved if I had tried to be impressive with my presentation starting in minute 1.

Drop the Business Speak

Another hazard of trying too hard to be impressive is focusing on sounding smart instead of focusing on really communicating.

I tend see these big-word, business-speak, smart-sounding people coming across as arrogant and contrived — which, by the way is also not impressive. It puts people off. And it’s not the way you would talk to your best friend.

It always amazes me how some people actively insist that talking in big words will make others think they are more impressive. It doesn’t work. Because clarity is more useful than simply sounding smart.

Never confuse being clear for not being smart.

Start with what is true for you

We all have situations that make us nervous where we need to make a good impression.

The good news is you have the secret formula already — Be yourself. You will never be more credible than when you are being authentic.

When you get scared, find something that is true for you. When you do this it has wonderful way of increasing your confidence and settling your nerves. I am always the most nervous when I am pushed to do or talk about something where I have not yet found the base thing that is true for me. That’s where I start.

Identify something that you truly care about or that you are genuinely enthusiastic about, and then start your preparation or presentation from there.

You’ll be so much more impressive!

What do you think?

Join the conversation about this on my facebook page.

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About Patty
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Patty Azzarello is an executive, best-selling author, speaker and CEO/Business Advisor. She became the youngest general manager at HP at the age of 33, ran a billion dollar software business at 35 and became a CEO for the first time at 38 (all without turning into a self-centered, miserable jerk)

You can find Patty at www.AzzarelloGroup.com, follow her on twitter or facebook, or read her book RISE…3 Practical Steps for Advancing Your Career, Standing Out as a Leader, AND Liking Your Life.

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Executive Presence and Confidence



This month’s Professional Development webinar was on the topic of Executive Presence and Confidence.

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Get the webinar

If you missed it you can download the recording.

Members of Azzarello group can download this webinar for free.

How you show up as a leader matters!

Executive Presence is an important factor in success. The good news is that anyone can develop it. It does not depend on personality type, level of humility, or require a particular physical appearance.

In this webinar I shared insights and practical ideas for how anyone can improve their executive presence and build their confidence.

This is a very useful webinar to download if you want to:

  • Build a stronger and more credible reputation
  • Deal with fear and that negative inner voice telling us we are not good enough
  • Improve your self confidence in particular, challenging situations
  • Compete for a bigger, executive level job
  • Become more recognized and respected for your efforts
  • Have more influence with key audiences

Good work is not enough!

Sure, it’s fair to think that the only thing that matters is delivering good work, but that’s not the way the world works.

How you show up as a leader is as important as what you deliver. Standing out requires that you own your successes and share your value with others.

In this webinar we talked about how to develop your executive presence in a practical, effective way that is authentic to you.

Increasing your confidence and presence

This webinar covers:

  • Why Executive Presence matters
  • The 4 critical aspects of Executive Presence
  • Dealing with fear, self-doubt and imposter syndrome
  • Developing your executive presence with key audiences

It matters

I talked about the importance of building trust and credibility, because people with high credibility get more done. That is really what this topic of Executive Presence is really about.

To get access to the resources, support, opportunities and network that you need to be successful, it requires that you invest in building your credibility on purpose.

4 Critical Aspects of Executive Presence

There are 4 key building blocks to develop strong, authentic and effective presence:

  1. How you Feel
  2. How you Look
  3. How you Behave
  4. How you deal with being Overwhelmed

In this webinar I shared insights about each of these topics and gave practical, doable ideas to implement each one in the most effective way to build Executive Presence.

Imposter Syndrome and Fear

At some point in our career, all of us feel like an imposter. We feel that we are not qualified to have this job and that we are going to get caught at some point.

It’s really helpful to understand that everyone feels this type fear. Everyone. It’s that annoying inner voice who is always ready to tell you that you are not good enough.

I shared some ideas for how to move forward when that voice inside your head is telling you that you can’t or shouldn’t, or that you don’t deserve it, or that you are not ready…

It’s OK to practice and prepare

It’s also important to realize that there is alway a chance to become better at having a strong personal presence.

I, myself, started out in the beginning of my career very shy and very awkward. Meetings with important people scared me. I didn’t know how to act.

I was told even as an executive that I did not have enough executive presence to go for a bigger executive job that I was interested in.

So I prepared and I practiced…

Don’t feel that if you do not have a strong executive presence today, that it impossible to achieve. Don’t think that people who do have a strong executive presence, have always been that way.

In the webinar I included worksheets to help you plan and prepare and practice for specific situations that make you feel uncomfortable, so you can keep your executive presence intact even in the most challenging situations.

Never be overwhelmed in public

Finally, one of the biggest killers of executive presence is to appear overwhelmed, rushed, stressed, or buried with work. Non of these thing shout, “executive in control”.

In the webinar I shared some ideas for what to do when you are indeed overwhelmed, and how to maintain or even build your credibility and presence while you deal with it.

Want some help?

To get some help with this and learn the specific ideas and techniques that we talked about, download the webinar: Executive Presence and Confidence, now.

Members: Download the webinar for free.
Non Members: You can purchase this individual webinar or podcast (links below).

There are some other really useful webinars in the Member Library related to this topic.

Members get these additional webinars for free:

So if you are not yet a member, you might as well join and get them all for free!

Let me be your mentor

Members of Azzarello Group basically get me as their mentor.

Every month you get new insights and tools in the form of these webinars, as well as the chance to call into a monthly members-only coaching hour where you can get direct personal coaching from me.

People tell me that membership gives them a totally new way of thinking about their career, getting promotions, solving difficult problems with bosses, peers, employees, and other annoying people, communicating better, being more influential, becoming a stronger leader, and enjoying their work more. I love to hear this, and I love to help!

If you join now, you’ll not only get this webinar, but all the other webinars in the Member Library.

AND you’ll get the opportunity to participate in monthly Coaching Hour conference calls with me.
Check out what we talk about.

AND as a member you’ll get to download your copy of the Career Year of action Guide (a $30 value) for free.

Membership is a great resource (and a steal at $179 for a whole year) to help you advance your career.

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Other Options:

Purchase just this webinar ($19.99)
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ABOUT PATTY:

patty blog image
Patty Azzarello is an executive, best-selling author, speaker and CEO/Business Advisor.
She became the youngest general manager at HP at the age of 33, ran a billion dollar software business at 35 and became a CEO for the first time at 38 (all without turning into a self-centered, miserable jerk)

You can find Patty at www.AzzarelloGroup.com, follow her on twitter or Facebook, or read her book RISE…3 Practical Steps for Advancing Your Career, Standing Out as a Leader, AND Liking Your Life.

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What to do when someone is attacking your credibility


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Bullies and Saboteurs

I think we all have those moments in our careers when we feel vulnerable because there is someone who is doing things to undermine our credibility.

I break this type of negative, damaging behavior into 2 groups.

1. Bully’s: People who are aggressive, dismissive, and attacking you to your face
2. Saboteurs: People who do their work to undermine you behind your back

Today I want to talk about saboteurs.

The attack…

Saboteurs are the people for example, who in a management review meeting (when you are not there) will say things like:

“I noticed that people in [your organization] are not motivated.”

Or

“I don’t understand these numbers coming from [your organization], it seems like they are underperforming”

Or

I’m not sure we need to be making such a big investment in [your area]

Or, a direct personal attack,

[Your name here], is hard to work with, and is causing problems in our organization.

It’s not about you

It’s important to realize that when people try to put you down it is never about you — it is always about them and their insecurity.

If they were really competent, secure people who are trying to improve the business they would not use this approach.

They would instead come to you directly and say, “I’m concerned about something. Could we talk so I can understand it better? Maybe I can help.”

The bad-mouthing behind your back does nothing to move the business forward. It only serves to feed something in their insecurity.

The dangerous issue happens when over busy executives “hear things” and don’t have the time to get the real story. Your brand can be damaged by saboteurs because people in the power structure simply don’t have the time to sort it all out.

So you have to deal with it. You need to make it stop.

Silencing your detractors

So how do you stop saboteurs? How do you shut down the negative publicity?

After you remember that it is not about you — it is always about them, the next thing you need to realize is that saboteurs only have power if they work in secret and in the shadows, behind the scenes.

Because what they are saying is not grounded in reality — it needs the shadows to strengthen it and to make it seem more exclusive and important.

So what you need to do, is to simply shine a giant spotlight on them.

Take away the safety and the power of their shadows

In a meeting where everyone is present, say, “I heard you have a concern about the numbers my group is delivering. I’d be happy to clarify, can you give me a specific example of what you are concerned about?”

Or, walk right up to them and say, “I heard that you are seeing a motivation issue in my team. This is very concerning and important to me. So let’s schedule a meeting in two days where you can present to me your detailed findings. I’ve already raised your concern with our boss, because this is so important, so I’m anxious to resolve it and I need your inputs.”

When you call them on it, you’ll find that they’ve got nothing real, and they’ll realize that they’ve got nothing real.

And they will also realize that they won’t be able to work in the shadows when it comes to you. You are going to call them on it. You are going to shine the spotlight into the darkness that they need to sustain their power, and force them to produce real data which they do not have.

They will back off because now you’ve made it no fun. You’ve taken away their strongest tool: the shadows where non-specific, negative talk like this thrives.

If they were talking about real data to improve the business, they wouldn’t need shadows and secrecy to do that. They could and would be straightforward about it.

This negative sabotage behavior is not about you. It’s only about their insecurity, or dubious motives.

Take them seriously

When you take the high ground and behave as though you take a saboteur seriously because you are serious about improving the business, you will find that they will very quickly be out of moves. They will be reluctant to attack you again because it’s too hard, it doesn’t work, and they run the risk of looking bad themselves when you ask them to get specific and they can’t.

What do you think?

How have you handled difficult situations with saboteurs?

Join the conversation about this on my facebook page.

Was this useful?

If you found this article useful, please help me share it with others and encourage them to subscribe to this Blog for free.


About Patty
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Patty Azzarello is an executive, best-selling author, speaker and CEO/Business Advisor. She became the youngest general manager at HP at the age of 33, ran a billion dollar software business at 35 and became a CEO for the first time at 38 (all without turning into a self-centered, miserable jerk)

You can find Patty at www.AzzarelloGroup.com, follow her on twitter or facebook, or read her book RISE…3 Practical Steps for Advancing Your Career, Standing Out as a Leader, AND Liking Your Life.

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Free eBook Download